Copy & Apply Site Template to a SharePoint site using Power Automate

If you have a requirement to copy a site template (Site Pages including images & webpart, site column, site content type, navigation etc) from an existing SharePoint site & apply it to a recently created SharePoint site, this blog post would be helpful.

Pre-requisites:

  • SharePoint site collection administrator
    • SharePoint site with a custom list associated to a Flow
  • Access to Premium connector (Azure Automation) in Power Automate
  • Azure subscription to create Azure Automation Runbook
Technical Diagram

SharePoint Patterns and Practices (PnP) community has developed a library of PowerShell commands (PnP PowerShell) that allows you to perform complex provisioning and artefact management actions towards SharePoint. On this example I will be using PnPProvisioningTemplate cmdlet’s to copy the pages including the assets & webparts to another site but you can do much more than this. Find the PnP cmdlets I will using

To generate a .pnp package (Site Template) from the source site

Get-PnPProvisioningTemplate -out template.pnp -Handlers PageContents -IncludeAllClientSidePages -PersistBrandingFiles

The parameter -PersistBrandingFiles saves all the asset files including the image files from the Site Assets library that makes up the composed look of page. Parameter -Handlers <Handlers> processes only the information passed to it. On the above example it processes only the Pages & its associated contents & not lists etc The PnP cmdlet Get-PnPProvisioningTemplate creates a package with extension .pnp which can be converted to a ZIP package by changing the extension to .ZIP from .pnp. Look at the Get-PnPProvisioningTemplate documentation for the various parameters it supports.

PnP package. Explore the Files folder

Once the package .pnp file is ready, the package can be applied to another site using the command Apply-PnPProvisioningTemplate

To Apply the Template to a destination site (Apply template to site):

Apply-PnPProvisioningTemplate .\template.pnp

If you want to test these commands in PowerShell console on your local computer, install the PnP module

Keep in mind before executing the PnPProvisioningTemplate commands, the site context must be created for both source & target site by creating a connection as shown below

Connect-PnPOnline -url “sourcesiteurl”
Get-PnPProvisioningTemplate -out template.pnp -Handlers PageContents -IncludeAllClientSidePages -PersistBrandingFiles
Connect-PnPOnline -url “targetsiteurl”
Apply-PnPProvisioningTemplate .\template.pn
p

Setup SharePoint List:

Till now you would have got some ideas about the PnP commands we will be using on the Azure Automation runbook, let’s now create the SharePoint list to collect the Source (Template to be copied from) & target URL (Template to be applied) for the SharePoint site. Find the list Schema for the List to be named as Site Template

Azure Automation Runbook:

The list is ready, let us now create the Azure automation runbook. I’ve written a post Execute SharePoint Online PowerShell scripts using Power Automate, it will help you with steps (Step 1 – Create automation account, Step 2 – Import SharePointPnPPowerShell Online PowerShell Module & Step 3 – Add user credentials) to create the automation account & runbook to execute the PnP PowerShell command for copying & applying the site template.

Step 4: Now we are good to create the Runbook, to create it click Runbooks under the section Process Automation and then click Create a runbook. Enter the Name of the Runbook ApplySiteTemplate, select the Runbook type to PowerShell and click Create.

Create Runbook in Azure Automation Account

Now let’s add the code by editing the runbook. The section Dynamic Parameters on the code will be passed from the flow. To connect to SharePoint Online site, we are using the SPO admin credentials created in Step 3. Find the code below

# Dynamic Parameters, will be passed from Flow
param(
  [parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
  [string]$SiteTemplateURL = "https://mydevashiq.sharepoint.com/sites/contosoportal",
  [parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
  [string]$ApplyTemplatetoURL = "https://mydevashiq.sharepoint.com/sites/contosositeportal"
)
# Credentials
$myCred = Get-AutomationPSCredential -Name "SPOAdminCred" 
# Connect to source site for creating the package or site template
Connect-PnPOnline -url $SiteTemplateURL -Credentials  $myCred
Get-PnPProvisioningTemplate -out template.pnp -Handlers PageContents -IncludeAllClientSidePages -PersistBrandingFiles
# Connect to destination site for applying the package or site template
Connect-PnPOnline -url $ApplyTemplatetoURL -Credentials  $myCred 
Apply-PnPProvisioningTemplate .\template.pnp

The runbook is now created, you can test the script by clicking on Test Pane & pass parameters (Site URL etc) to test it. Click Publish button as shown below to publish so that it can be called from Power Automate.

You can also create the template (PnP Package) for a site & store it on a SP library. The PnP command to get the file

Connect-PnPOnline -url “siteurlwhichhasthePnPpackagefile” -Credentials  $myCred
Get-PnPFile -Url "/sites/sitenamewithPnPPackagefile/Shared Documents/template.pnp" -Filename "template.pnp" -AsFile

It’s now time to create the flow to call the Runbook.

Power automate flow to call the Run Book:

You can now create a flow with automated trigger “When an item is created” from the SharePoint list created earlier to pass the Site Template URL & Apply to Site Template URL. Once the flow is created, add the action “Create Job” under the connector “Azure Automation” which is a premium connector.

Select the Azure Subscription which has the Automation account resource with runbook>Select Resource Group>Select Automation Account>Select the Runbook name which has the PS script. If there is a need to wait until the automation job completes then select Yes on the field “Wait for Job”. Enter the URL for SiteTemplateURL & ApplyTemplatetoURL

The flow is ready, run it to test now with parameters. I’ve used this sample to test a site (Template) which has

  • Customized home page with couple of standard webpart & images
  • 2 more pages with images & other standard webparts

has copied to another site. If there is a custom webpart on the source site which is added to a page, make sure to deploy it on the destination site.

Summary: Take a look at the SharePoint starter kit PnP package to explore more about the usage of different features in PnP provisioning. This example can also be extended with Site design & Site script which has the capability to call a flow. Hope you have enjoyed reading this post and find it useful. If you have any comments or feedback, please provide it on the comments section below.

Automated trigger recurrence frequency – Power Automate

Have you ever noticed on your Automated flow with trigger for e.g Item created or modified on a SharePoint list will not run immediately as & when there was an item either created or modified in the list? The reason is all the automated triggers has a recurrent frequency schedule which is set to 3 mins, it means it looks for the changes in the SharePoint list every 3 mins. To check this, go to Peek Code on the trigger to check the interval frequency

For the When an Item is created trigger

This setting cannot be changed in Power Automate but with Azure Logic Apps you can adjust this setting. For more details on the pricing, refer to this link

The same trigger with Logic apps which has options to update the recurrent frequency interval

The other advantage with Logic apps there is a code view to update & Save which is not the case with Power Automate. In Power Automate, you can only view the code & not update

Hope this information was useful in some way. If you have any comments, let me know on the comments section.

Automate the provision of On-Premise AD Account – Part 2

This post is in continuation to my previous post Automate the provision of Azure AD Account & License assignment – Part 1 for creating account in Azure active directory using Power Automate. On this post I will highlight the feature available in Azure Automation account which can be leveraged to create an On-premise AD account. Refer to this post for the usage of Azure automation account to interact with SharePoint online in Microsoft 365 using Power Automate.

Azure Automation is so easy to setup for automating tasks that interacts with

  • Azure (Azure AD, SQL etc)
  • M365 services (SharePoint etc). 

Automation runbooks in Azure might not have access to resources in other clouds or in your on-premises environment because they run on the Azure cloud platform. To access local resources like On-premise Active Directory which lives behind the firewall, there is a feature within Azure Automation called as Hybrid runbook worker. Azure Automation Hybrid Workers extends Azure Automation into your private networks and allows running runbooks that interacts with resources such as on-premises Active Directory, SharePoint etc.

Hybrid Runbook Worker feature to run runbooks directly on the

  • Computer in On-premise network
  • Any secured network like a virtual machine in Azure behind the firewall
  • Cloud services like AWS etc

that’s hosting the role and against resources in the environment to manage local resources. Refer to this documentation about Hybrid runbook worker for more information.

The following image from Microsoft documentation illustrates this functionality:

Pre-requisite:

  1. Azure Subscription to create
    • Automation Account
    • Log Analytics Workspace
  2. Server (Windows or Linux based)
    • Internet access
    • Port: Only TCP 443 required for outbound internet access

The deployment instructions from Microsoft for

I’ve found a really interesting video on Youtube from Travis Robert regarding this topic to set this up on Windows workstation.

Once the Hybrid runbook worker is setup, you can write PowerShell script to create account in On premise Active directory. Find the link to the script to add a user to Active directory in Onpremise. The parameters for the AD account (attributes like name, location, jobtitle, manager etc) to the runbook can be passed from a SharePoint List in Office 365 which could then be triggered using a Flow.

Summary: I was not able to give you a complete walkthrough but I hope had given some pointers to connect on-premise AD. Forgive my ignorance if I have made some mistakes since I don’t have much experience with IT infrastructure. Hope you find this post useful & informational. Let me know if there is any comments or feedback below.

Execute SharePoint Online PowerShell scripts using Power Automate

Most of us would have used PowerShell for SharePoint to manage SharePoint settings at the organization level and site collection level. SharePoint Online PowerShell commands are very efficient for batch operations for e.g creating multiple sites, list items etc. To use the SharePoint Online PowerShell commands

  • You must have the SharePoint Admin role or Global Administrator role in Office 365
  • Install the SharePoint Online Management Shell module

As you know you must be administrator to install a PowerShell module on your workstation which not everyone will have in corporate environments.

I often use a PowerShell script to enable App Catalog at a site collection level to test the PnP webparts & extensions before deploying at the tenant level app catalog based on requirement. If you are not an SPO admin then the dependency is with the SPO admin. In this blogpost I am going to show you how to automate this process by executing PowerShell script to enable App catlog in Azure using Power Automate.

Pre-requisite & permissions:

  • SPO Admin
  • Azure Subscription to create Automation account
  • Access to Premium connector (Azure Automation) in Power Automate
  • SharePoint List to collect details about the site which needs to have App catalog enabled

To complete this automation process, create the following two components

  1. Automation account in Azure with a Run Book to execute PowerShell script for enabling App Catalog in SP site
  2. Power automate flow to call the Run Book

Automation account in Azure with a Run Book to execute PowerShell script for enabling App Catalog in SP siteAutomation service in Azure is a cloud-based automation and configuration service that supports consistent management across your Azure and non-Azure environments. Go through the documentation from Microsoft to know about this powerfull service in Azure. Let’s use the service in Azure to create a simple Runbook with PowerShell code to enable App catalog in SPO site, you can do much more than this using this service. Refer to this link for the pricing details for the automation service in Azure.

Step 1: Go the Azure portal & create a resource Automation

Enter the name of the automation account, select the Subscription & resource group & click Create

Step 2: After the resource is created, go to the resource & click Modules Gallery under the section Shared Resources as shown below to add the PS SPO module

Search with the keyword “SharePoint” & click “Microsoft.Onlie.SharePoint.PowerShell” and then click Import. This step will the add the SharePoint online PowerShell module for us to use the available PS SPO cmdlets in Runbook.

Now click modules & verify if the SPO PowerShell is added & available.

Step 3: The next step is to add the user credentials (Username & Password) of the SPO admin which is safe & secure by not hardcoding the password on the Runbook. You can also use certificates or AppID AppSecret in PnP online Powershell for creating connection to SPO.

Step 4: Now we are good to create the Runbook, to create it click Runbooks under the section Process Automation and then click Create a runbook. Enter the Name of the Runbook, select the Runbook type to PowerShell and click Create.

Now let’s add the code by editing the runbook to enable app catalog. The section Dynamic Parameters on the code will be passed from flow. To connect to SharePoint Online we are using the SPO admin credentials created in the previous step. Find the code below

# Dynamic Parameters
param(
  [parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
  [string]$SiteURL = "https://domain.sharepoint.com/sites/contosoportal",
  [parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
  [boolean]$enableAppCatalog = 1
)
# Credentials
$myCred = Get-AutomationPSCredential -Name "SPOAdminCred" 
# Parameters
$AdminSiteURL = "https://domain-admin.sharepoint.com"
# Connect to SharePoint Online
Connect-SPOService -Url $AdminSiteURL -Credential $myCred 
# Get the Site Collection
$Site = Get-SPOSite -Identity $SiteURL 
# Enable App catalog
if($enableAppCatalog)
{Add-SPOSiteCollectionAppCatalog -Site $Site}
# Disable App catalog if false
else{Remove-SPOSiteCollectionAppCatalog -Site $Site}
# Get Site Collection Title
Write-Output $Site.Title

The runbook is now created, you can test the script by clicking on Test Pane & pass parameters (Site URL etc) to test it. Click Publish button as shown below to publish so that it can be called from Power Automate. It’s now time to create the flow

Power automate flow to call the Run Book

You can now create a flow with automated trigger from a SharePoint list to get the site url & Boolean value either to enable or disable the app catalog on the site. Here I will be using an Instant flow with trigger “Manually trigger a Flow”

Once the flow is created, add the action “Create Job” under the connector “Azure Automation” which is a premium connector.

Select the Azure Subscription which has the Automation account resource with runbook>Select Resource Group>Select Automation Account>Select the Runbook name which has PS script to enable app catalog. If there is a need to wait until the automation job completes then select Yes on the field “Wait for Job”. For the dynamic parameter, write a JSON to pass the mandatory & optional parameters to the runbook script. On this example I will be passing the Site URL & Boolean value to either enable or disable app catalog using JSON as below

{
  "SiteURL": "https://domain.sharepoint.com/sites/MyFirstTeam",
  "enableAppCatalog": 1
}

If using a SharePoint list, construct the above JSON dynamically with the URL

The flow is ready, run it to test now with parameters.

 Summary: The use case I’ve chosen is a simple one but azure automation can be a more powerful service to perform various automation tasks. Find few below

  • Write Python script in the Runbook
  • Many samples are available within the Runbook gallery (Create AD user, Display All provisioned site collections etc) under the section Process automation.
  • With the PowerShell type Runbook all the PS modules (Azure AD for automating AD account creation, PNP SP Online etc) are readily available for us to import easily.
  • There is a feature by name “Hybrid Runbook Worker Feature” available within Azure Automation account for us to connect Onpremise resources in Azure (e.g SharePoint Onpremise, Onpremise AD etc).
  • Create a Webhook to call the runbook from an External application by making a POST call
  • Call a custom built dll by importing them in to the Modules section
  • Create graphical Runbook with GUI to add cmdlets & to configure the steps
  • Create schedule linking a runbook

Hope you have enjoyed reading this post and find it useful. If you have any comments or feedback, please provide it on the comments section below.

Access Active Directory user profile attributes using Graph API

Using graph API you can access all the Active directory attributes. The me endpoint gives your profile information https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me. To get a specific user’s information the endpoint should be https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/users/useremailaddress

For getting any specific AD attribute you can pass the required attribute as a query string https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me?$select=jobTitle,department,displayName

In bigger active directory implementation, there will also be information stored on the Extension attributes, to get the information you will have to pass the name of the attribute “OnPremisesExtensionattributes” as a query string in the format as

 https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me?$select=jobTitle,department,displayName, OnPremisesExtensionattributes

Graph explorer is a nice tool to test the Graph endpoints. Refer the documentation from Microsoft on the different available AD endpoints

Graph Explorer

The beta ME endpoint https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/me gives more information of the user

The User profile service Rest API endpoint in SharePoint http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties does not provide all the active directory information. For e.g Location, OnPremisesextensionAttributes etc information is not available. SharePoint UPS synchronizes the AD data of all users in schedule basis. So the other option is to use the Graph Endpoint if you need those information for your application customization.

Endpoint point to get a specific attribute is

https://siteURL/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties?$select=PictureUrl,AccountName

For more information about different endpoint, refer this documentation from Microsoft.

Change the original Owner of a Power App & Flow

Has there been a requirement or a need to change the owner/creator of the PowerApps or a Flow built by your organizational users? There could be various reasons for this request

  • App/flow creator would have left the organization
  • App/flow creator would have changed role within the organization
  • Handing over the app to the operations team…

By the time I am writing this post there are no Powershell command or actions available in Flow/PowerApp to change the original Owner of the flow but still you would be able to assign a Owner for the flow created by an user who has left the Organization from the Flow Admin center, I will cover the steps on this post. The good news is Microsoft has plans to release this feature as per this user voice request.

Prerequisite: Environment Admin or Power Platform Admin

Change the Owner of a Power App:

There are different ways to change the Owner of Power Apps using

  1. Power Shell
  2. Flow
  3. Power App

PowerShell cmdlets for PowerApps:

There is a PowerApps cmdlet for Administrators Set-AdminPowerAppOwner which allows you change the Owner of the App

Prerequisite: The following modules should be installed. It requires Administrator access on the workstation to install the modules

Install-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.Administration.PowerShell
Install-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.PowerShell -AllowClobber

If you don’t have admin access, then you can import the modules to your workstation using the following commands

Save-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.Administration.PowerShell -Path
Import-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.Administration.PowerShell
Save-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.PowerShell -Path
Import-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.PowerShell

Power Shell cmdlet for changing the Owner:

# This call opens prompt to collect credentials (Azure Active Directory account and password) used by the commands 
Add-PowerAppsAccount
Set-AdminPowerAppOwner -AppName '6aac46a2-a0f3-43f3-a2fb-51111785437c' -AppOwner '4cea7f11-c013-4bee-a6d1-ae3381a7f386' -EnvironmentName 'Default-2r6e8761-108d-417e-9bb4-e7c4e3ba2e23'
  1. EnvironmentName is the environment of the PowerApp you would like to change the Owner. To get the environment name, the powershell command will help Get-PowerAppEnvironment
  2. App Name is the App ID of the PowerApp. To get this information run the command Get-PowerApp ‘Name of the powerapp’
  3. AppOwner is the Azure Active directory object id of the new Owner. It is the Unique id of the user in the tenant, you can get this information in multiple ways. To get it from flow, the following action would help. The outputs of this action should have the attribute Id which is the id of the user to be passed on the Powershell command.

The old owner will get viewer access to the app but you can get it changed if required. For other Powershell cmdlets for PowerApps & flow refer this article from Microsoft.

PowerShell Tip:

To get help on any Power shell cmdlet, type Get-Help cmdletname (e.g get-help Set-AdminPowerAppOwner). To get some examples type get-help Set-AdminPowerAppOwner -examples

PowerApps for Admin Connector in Flow:

There is a preview action by the name “Set App Owner” under the connector PowerApps for admin which also helps you to change the owner of the PowerApp

PowerApps for Admin Connector in PowerApp:

The same connector used in the flow can also be used in PowerApp to change the owner for the powerapp. There is a Powerapps tool Connector Browser Tool from Microsoft to test the PowerApps for Admin connector which can be used to change the Owner of the app. The app is available as a package for download from this link, the link to the blogpost from Microsoft. You can select any actions, after entering values for the parameters click Submit.

You can test connector for Flow as well on this tool.

Assign an Owner for a Flow created by an user who has left Organization:

This can be done by connecting to the Flow Admin center, click the environment which has the flow

Click resources & then click Flows

Then look for the flow which needs the update, click the flow & click Manage sharing to add Owner

You can also export the flow as a package & then recreate it to have a new Owner. Follow this blogpost from Microsoft.

Summary: On this post, I’ve covered different ways to update the owner for PowerApps & Flow using Powershell & Admin connector in Flow & PowerApps. Hope you find this post useful & informational. Let me know if there is any comments or feedback below.

Automate the provision of Azure AD Account & License assignment – Part 1

A decade back I was part of a team to automate the On & Offboarding process of employees for a customer using .NET framework, it had a module to provision user accounts in an on-premise environment. I still remember having used couple of dll’s for Active directory 2003 & exchange 2007 to create AD & Email account. It was not easy but nowadays with the Office 365 in place its so easy to create account & enable different Office 365 services (Exchange, SharePoint, Yammer etc) for a user in Azure Active directory. This example will be applicable for the Organization which does not have On-premise Active directory. Organizations having On-premise active directory, the user account’s will be synchronized from On-premise AD to Azure AD. On this post I am going show you how to

  1. Create Azure AD account & assign license using Power Automate
  2. Assign License using Graph Endpoint

Create Azure AD account & assign license using Power Automate:

There is a Power Automate action Create user under the connector Azure AD which helps us to create account in Azure AD but there is no action as of now to assign individual license to a user but we can overcome this by adding the user to the AD security group which has a license assigned to it.

There is a flow action Add user to group under the same connector for adding the user to the security group, all the members of the group will get the license assigned on that group. The Azure AD connector does not return custom attributes of Azure AD. For e.g you can’t assign a value to a custom AD attribute with the Create user action, if you want to assign a custom attribute or an attribute which is not exposed in the Create User action then the account has to be created using PowerShell. There are ways to call a PowerShell script from Azure Automation Runbooks with the help of a flow action.

Other Azure AD actions apart from the above screenshot which could be of use are

  • Create group
  • Get group members
  • Get groups of a user
  • Get user
  • Remove Member from Group
  • Update user

There are templates available in Power automate template section which helps you create account based on the information from the SharePoint List, based on HTTP request etc

Prerequisite:

  • Permissions on Azure AD:
    • Group.ReadWrite.All
    • User.ReadWrite.All
    • Directory.ReadWrite.All
  • Security group with license assigned

For assigning a license to Security group, go to Azure AD Admin center. Follow this documentation from Microsoft to assign license to a group.

You can also turn off certain services from the license to the group, for e.g Turning off the Power App service for the user

You can also use dynamic groups for assigning license to a user, if you have dynamic group based license assignment to a user then you could ignore the step on the flow to add user to the security group. Dynamic groups works based on rules to determine group membership, for e.g if a user has an AD attribute set for Department. In this case the AD user created with certain department will get automatically added to the group which will in turn assign a license to the user.

Let’s now create the flow, I have used an Instant flow with trigger Manually Trigger a flow. Add the action Create user from the connector Azure AD

Now add the action Add user to group, the Group Id should be for the Security group which has a license assigned to it. The User Id field should be dynamic value Id from the previous action Create user.

To get the group Id, go to Azure AD

Run the flow. Once the flow runs successful the user account will be provisioned on Azure Ad with a license.

Assign License using Graph Endpoint:

There is a beta graph endpoint to assign license to a user. Find the Microsoft documentation for more information

All types of license (E5, E3, PowerApps, Power etc) has a Service Plan id also called as SKU id. Find the list of SKU id’s on this link if your tenant has procured the license for the service

 To get the available service plan or SKU ID, make a GET call to the endpoint https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/subscribedSkus & also from the beta endpoint of the user https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/me

Once the sku id are available based on the type of license to be assigned, you will have to make a POST call to

Endpoint URL: https://graph.microsoft.com/beta /users/testuser10@mydevashiq.onmicrosoft.com/assignLicense

Request Body:

{
  "addLicenses": [
        {
            "disabledPlans": [],
            "skuId": "b05e124f-c7cc-45a0-a6aa-8cf78c946968"
        },
        {
            "disabledPlans": [],
            "skuId": "a403ebcc-fae0-4ca2-8c8c-7a907fd6c235"
        }
  ],
  "removeLicenses": []
}

The first SKU id is for Enterprise Mobility & Power BI (Free)

To remove the license for a user, use the collection removeLicenses. This graph endpoint to assign license can also be called from a Flow.

Summary: You can also use a HTTP request trigger in the Flow for integrating with other applications. On next post I will write about creating account in On-premise Active Directory. Hope you find this post useful & informational. Let me know if there is any comments or feedback below.

SharePoint Search REST API query not returning all results

Have you ever faced a scenario where you have built search customization using Rest API with SPFx or custom display template in SharePoint 2013 etc which did not return all search results. I was facing this today while trying to get data based on a content type, it was returning only few results.

The reason is because Search API by default removes duplicates as documented by Microsoft. Items that are identical or nearly identical are removed from the result set.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/dev/general-development/sharepoint-search-rest-api-overview#trimduplicates

Set the property trimduplicates to false on the Search API as below if there is a need

https://domainname/sites/sitename/_api/search/query?querytext=’contenttype:”the name of the content type”‘&trimduplicates=false&rowlimit=500&selectproperties=’Title’&sortlist=’LastModifiedTime:descending’

Hope it helps someone.

@ mention user & channel in Teams using MS Graph API

There are ways to @mention a user while posting a conversation in Teams channel using flow action but as far as I know its not possible as of now to @mention a Teams channel using Flow actions. In this post, I will show you how to @mention a channel & user using a POST call to a MS Graph beta endpoint. To construct the endpoint URL you will need to know the TeamID & ChannelID, to get the information go to Teams > click the three dots > click Get link to channel > Copy the URL

Now decode the copied url, I’ve used Meyerweb Decoder. Your url will look something like below

End Point URL: https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/teams/groupIDorTeamID/channels/Channel ID/messages

Method: POST

Request Body:

{
 "importance": "high",
  "subject": "@Mention in Teams channel post!",
  "body": 
  {
    "content": "Hello <at id ='0'>Channel Name</at>, Test message on the channel with at mention.",
    "contentType": "html"
  },
  "mentions": [
    {
      "id": 0,
      "mentionText": "Channel Name",
      "mentioned": {
                        "conversation": {
                            "id": "ChannelID",
                            "displayName": "Channel Name",
                            "conversationIdentityType@odata.type": "#Microsoft.Teams.GraphSvc.conversationIdentityType",
                            "conversationIdentityType": "channel"
                        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

I’ve used Graph explorer to test the endpoint, if you have not signed in do sign in

Once you run the query on the explorer, you will see the Post in Channel with at mention as shown below

To @mention a user using Graph API, the endpoint is same as before but the request body has some changes as shown below

Request Body:

{
  "body": {
    "contentType": "html",
    "content": "Hello World User Display Name"
  },
  "mentions": [
    {
      "id": 0,
      "mentionText": "User Display Name",
      "mentioned": {
        "user": {
          "displayName": "User Display Name",
          "id": "UserID",
          "userIdentityType": "aadUser"
        }
      }
    }
  ]
}

To get your UserID, you can use the endpoint https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me/

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/graph/api/channel-post-messages?view=graph-rest-beta&tabs=http

Summary: The endpoint which has been used in this post are beta endpoints. Graph API can be easily called using Power Automate, if you need some example on using a Graph API refer this post. Hope you find this post useful & informational. Let me know if there is any comments or feedback below.

Collect response from a user with Adaptive Card in Teams using Power Automate

This is in continuation to my earlier post using Adaptive card for collecting information in Outlook also known as Outlook actionable message. On this post I am going to show you how to collect information from a user in Teams and storing the values back in a SharePoint list. The following Power Automate actions under Microsoft Teams connector are now available in preview mode which helps us to capture data back from a Teams adaptive card meaning you would be able to make POST calls back to the flow by click of a button (Action.Submit) on the Adaptive card

  1. Post an adaptive card as the Flow bot to a Teams user, and wait for a response
  2. Post an adaptive card as the Flow bot to a Teams channel, and wait for a response

Once an Adaptive card is posted in Teams using the above actions, the flow run will not continue until the recipient or someone in the channel (if sent to channel) responds to inputs that are required within the card till then the flow is put on wait for maximum period (Async calls) of 30 days as per the documentation. Post that period the flow will time out if no one responds to the card. There can be use case to collect responses from users in Teams & post it to Azure services like SQL etc, this avoids the users to have access to premium services or license since the card is sent using Power automate. The use case I’ve chosen for this post is to collect Name & Email address of a teams user by sending them an input form which stores the responses in a SharePoint list after the user responds. Find the resources I’ve used for this example

  • Adaptive Card Designer for creating JSON
  • Automated Flow with action to post an JSON Adaptive card using the connector MS Teams
  • SharePoint custom list with columns Name & Email
  • Microsoft Teams with the Flow App installed

Adaptive Card Creation:

Let’s start by designing the card using the Adaptive card designer. Click on Open Sample, select Input Form as shown below

Then change the host app from the default Bot Framework Webchat to Microsoft Teams – Light (Optional Step). Remove the Phone number Text Block [Element] & the corresponding Text.Input [Inputs] field to keep it simple & I’ve also changed the Adaptive card image URL on the right column to the following URL since the image default image on the sample has got some issues rendering on teams. Find some information on image size & resolutions limits here.

Click Copy Card JSON from ribbon for this card to be used on the flow. We now have the adaptive cards JSON ready with us, let’s go ahead and the create the flow using Power Automate. Find the generated JSON below

{
    "$schema": "http://adaptivecards.io/schemas/adaptive-card.json",
    "type": "AdaptiveCard",
    "version": "1.0",
    "body": [
        {
            "type": "ColumnSet",
            "columns": [
                {
                    "type": "Column",
                    "width": 2,
                    "items": [
                        {
                            "type": "TextBlock",
                            "text": "Tell us about yourself",
                            "weight": "Bolder",
                            "size": "Medium"
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "TextBlock",
                            "text": "We just need a few more details to get you booked for the trip of a lifetime!",
                            "isSubtle": true,
                            "wrap": true
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "TextBlock",
                            "text": "Don't worry, we'll never share or sell your information.",
                            "isSubtle": true,
                            "wrap": true,
                            "size": "Small"
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "TextBlock",
                            "text": "Your name",
                            "wrap": true
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "Input.Text",
                            "id": "myName",
                            "placeholder": "Last, First"
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "TextBlock",
                            "text": "Your email",
                            "wrap": true
                        },
                        {
                            "type": "Input.Text",
                            "id": "myEmail",
                            "placeholder": "youremail@example.com",
                            "style": "Email"
                        }
                    ]
                },
                {
                    "type": "Column",
                    "width": 1,
                    "items": [
                        {
                            "type": "Image",
                            "url": "https://download-ssl.msgamestudios.com/content/mgs/ce/production/SolitaireWin10/dev/adapative_card_assets/v1/tile_spider.png",
                            "size": "auto"
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ]
        }
    ],
    "actions": [
        {
            "type": "Action.Submit",
            "title": "Submit"
        }
    ]
}

Flow Creation:

Create an Instant flow with trigger “Manually trigger a Flow”, this will post an Adaptive card to a Teams user with the Input form which collects response to a SharePoint list. Create a SharePoint list with two columns for us to store the Name and Email submitted from the adaptive card on Teams.

Add the flow action “Post an adaptive card as the Flow bot to a Teams user, and wait for a response”, on the action

  1. Enter the email address of the user in the Recipient field
  2. Paste the JSON copied from the card designer in the Message field
  3. Enter information to be shown to the user on the field Update message after the Submit button is clicked
  4. Field Should update card to be set as Yes

Now add the action “Create item” to store the form response in the SharePoint list created above with the request body information mapped to Name (myName) & Email (myEmail) using the dynamic content. The dynamic content has also information about the user (Email, Display Name, Response time etc) responded in Teams

The flow is ready, Run the flow to test it. The recipient would have received the card in Teams as below

After the user keys in the Name & Email address on Teams and clicking Submit button will complete the flow till then the flow will be in wait state for a period of 30 days maximum. The data will be submitted to the SharePoint list and the card will be updated with the update message as below

There is an Adaptive card designer in Power Automate which is an experimental feature currently with which you would able to design/update Adaptive card in the Power Automate action. To enable it, click the cog wheel on your flow environment and click  “View All Power Automate settings”. On the popup toggle the Experimental Features to On and click Save button.

Go back to the flow in Edit mode, the Teams action will now have an Adaptive card designer as shown below

Senior Program Manager for Power Automate Audrie Gordon has a great video on Adaptive cards for Power Automate which has lot of information.

If you run in to an error while submitting the form or triggering the flow, look at the Troubleshooting tips for Adaptive cards. There are few known issues documented here with regards to using this action on Power Automate.

Reference: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/power-automate/overview-adaptive-cards

Summary: You now have created an input form for collecting information from a user in teams. To know the future road map for Adaptive cards, click here to know. There are couple of amazing templates available in the Flow environment, just search for Adaptive card in templates where you get template for different use cases. Hope you have enjoyed reading this post and find it useful. If you have any comments or feedback, please provide it on the comments section below.